Every Dead Thing by John Connolly

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Every Dead Thing
Cover of Every Dead Thing by John Connolly
Author(s) John Connolly
Published May 11th, 1999
Publisher Pocket Books
Genre(s) Horror
Mystery
Thriller
Age group Adult


Every Dead Thing by John Connolly is an adult horror mystery thriller novel, originally published on May 11, 1999. It is the first book in the Charlie Parker series.

Trigger Warnings

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  • Alcoholism
    Talks about past struggles with alcohol.
  • Animal Death
    A dog is shot, brief and not explicit.
  • Child abuse
    Part of the plot deals with physical and sexual torture of children, nothing explicit, but mentioned several times.
  • Child death
  • Depression
  • Drugs
  • Emesis
  • Gore
    Heavy and graphic descriptions of violence and mutilated bodies, including skinning, eye trauma and disembowelment, both of adults and of children.
  • Gun violence
  • Homophobia
    Minor character tells a homophobic story with derogatory terms, but is challenged on it.
  • Kidnapping
  • Murder
  • Needles
  • Occult
  • Pedophilia
    Part of the plot deals with physical and sexual torture of children, nothing explicit, but mentioned several times.
  • Physical abuse
    Part of the plot deals with physical and sexual torture of children, nothing explicit, but mentioned several times.
  • Police brutality
  • Racism
    Including racial slurs. Challenged.
  • Rape
    Part of the plot deals with physical and sexual torture of children, nothing explicit, but mentioned several times.
  • Suicide
    A character commits suicide by gunshot.
  • Torture
    Part of the plot deals with physical and sexual torture of children, nothing explicit, but mentioned several times.

Representation

An asterisk (*) indicates that the author openly identifies with that identity.

  • Gay black side character
  • Gay side character

Tropes